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The population challenge

 http://tns.thenews.com.pk/population-challenge/#.WqJhJuhubIV

Rising population poses a serious threat to Pakistan’s progress. Here are a few suggestions by experts to stem the crisis

The population challenge
 The biggest issues facing Pakistan are the booming population growth and the lack of awareness across the board regarding how big a threat this poses to the country’s progress. Simply put, the country has too many people and not matching resources in the spheres of food, health, education, and employment systems. Conferences are held and experts join their heads in exasperation to think of policies and projects that can manage this unbridled growth. Yet, the most basic of problems is often overlooked — raising awareness.

If enough efforts are not made to slow down Pakistan’s population growth rate, the population will likely increase from the current 189 million people to 310 million by 2050 (UN DESA, 2015). But this is a conservative estimate. According to President Population Association of Pakistan and Chairman Punjab Higher Education Commission Dr Nizamuddin, the country’s population would cross the 395 million mark by 2047. He said this at the recently held Eighteenth Annual Population Research Conference, Population Growth and Investing in Human Resource Development, in collaboration with Government College University Lahore. With just three years left to achieve its FP 2020 targets, Pakistan’s high growth rate of 2.4 per cent depicted in Population Census of 2017 asks for serious efforts.

Speakers at the conference gave different and relevant solutions to how the challenge can be met. Dr Aziz Rab of Greenstar Marketing emphasised on a number of ideas, all aimed at raising general awareness among people regarding family planning, like a toll free number where people can get guidance regarding FP, as well as free air time for the purpose. However, all of this would need political will and support from the government.

If enough efforts are not made to slow down Pakistan’s population growth rate, the population will likely increase from the current 189 million people to 310 million by 2050 (UN DESA, 2015). But this is a conservative estimate.

Dr Attiya Inayatullah, Chairperson Rahnuma Group of Pakistan, pressed upon the need for public-private partnerships to achieve the desired targets. She expressed the need to bring the private sector on board in all FP efforts, as well as leveraging men to become allies in this endeavour. Stalwarts of the field like Dr Mehtab S. Karim, Executive Director, Centre for Studies in Population & Health, Dr. Zeba A. Sathar, Country Director, Population Council, and Dr. Farid Midhet, Vice President, Population Association of Pakistan & Country Director, Jhpiego Pakistan, participated in the conference.

A panel discussion on Pakistan’s 6th population census results, organised by Jhpiego and the Population Association of Pakistan, had experts debating the methodology of the population census 2017. Journalist Zofeen Ebrahim who was invited as a panelist at the session, said that now that Pakistan has a fair idea of the numbers “we need to focus on planning for the people in earnest instead of quibbling over the methodology of the census”.

As Dr Inayatullah pointed out, Pakistan has the know-how and can achieve the targets. What it needs right now is a reality check, she said. “There are two gaps: Implementation is key for which we must get down to the grass roots. And secondly, where do we find a political leader who will speak out boldly in an upfront manner about this?”

A possible solution

While moots like the aforementioned conference give the much needed impetus to the issue at the top of the pyramid, doctors working at grassroots level like obstetrician Dr Halima Yasmeen at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC) Karachi, feel that growth rate cannot be slowed down till awareness is raised. For this, dedicated counselors who can talk to women and convince them to use contraceptives can play a core role.

“It is an evidence-based fact that introducing a cadre of FP counselors shows better results when it comes to use of contraceptives. These counselors should be there at hospitals 24/7, just like nursing and janitorial staff is there round the clock. And their job should be only to talk to people,” she said, emphasising the importance of convincing people to use contraceptives.

“Our doctors are fulfilling their own dreams, and are on autopilot mode. What they are not doing is fulfilling the needs of this country as a whole,” said Dr Azra Ahsan, gynaecologist and consultant at the National Committee for Maternal and Neonatal Health (NCMNH). Dr Ahsan, while talking to The News on Sunday, expressed that the key to solving this problem lies in sensitising healthcare practitioners. “Every healthcare provider should know about providing family planning (FP) services. But they are not taught how to do it properly even in medical colleges. They don’t even know how to manage post-partum hemorrhage, because there is no glamour in this kind of healthcare service,” she says.

With mobility restrictions and traditional barriers, women don’t readily come to hospitals and clinics. However, the rates of women opting for deliveries in hospitals or healthcare units has gone up considerably, and this allows a great opportunity to convince them for post-partum contraception. “Most women do not come back for follow ups, which means that they will not get contraception-related advice in time,” says Dr Ahsan, commenting on golden opportunities that keep slipping through the net.

A project of NCMNH involved stationing two to three dedicated FP counselors in selected hospitals in Karachi, and this strategic placement multiplied the number of women opting for contraceptives like Intra-Uterine Devices (IUDs). “The day the counselors didn’t come, we saw that no women opted for contraceptives,” says Dr Ahsan.

8 Pakistani women you should follow on Twitter

Published: May 19, 2015
PHOTO: TWITTER

PHOTO: TWITTER

Though expansive in its content, a recently combined list of Twitter accounts belonging to Muslim women from around the world lacked representation from Pakistan.

Here at The Express Tribune, we compiled our own list of 8 Pakistani women that we believe you must follow. Our list consists of Pakistani women from all walks of life: journalists, activists, academics, actors and authors. Following these women is a must for those looking to gain an added perspective to the rather male-dominated public opinion.

1. @MehreenKasana

PHOTO: TWITTER

Her bio is three words long: one woman army. And that is precisely what Mehreen Kasana is. Not only is she one of Pakistan’s top bloggers, but it is her unique take on things that makes her a top choice for our list. She is an activist and a progressive, through and through. She speaks loudly and bravely against racism and Islamophobia and truly thinks outside the box. Mehreen is one of those who build bridges between extremes.

2. @SanaSaleem

PHOTO: TWITTER

Though Sana is widely known as a rights activist, her humour and her anecdotes with her Daadi are worth a read. Director of “Bolo Bhi”, Sana is a fearless voice against state censorship, and an expert in digital rights and security. She says what she has to by cloaking it in biting wit.

3. @SheikhImaan

PHOTO: TWITTER

With the wittiest sense of humour, hands down, Imaan is an entertainer and wins over tweeps with her charm. Agree with her or not, you cannot ignore her. Reading any tweet by the Buzzfeed author is either time well spent or time well wasted.

4. @SamarMinallahKh

PHOTO: TWITTER

She makes us proud simply with all the good work she does. Anthropologist and documentary film-maker, Samar’s work for women’s rights, especially child marriage, has changed many lives for the better. Her roots are firmly planted in indigenous sensibilities of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa from where she hails, and her work is thus respected both locally and globally.

5. @Mehreen Zahra-Malik

PHOTO: TWITTER

The Reuters correspondent for Pakistan is a great source for the latest rumblings in Islamabad. She might get a few details wrong here and there, but for the most part Malik tackles stories that local media can’t or won’t.

6. @Zofeen28

PHOTO: FACEBOOK

As one of Pakistan’s most respected feature writers and journalists, she brings to the fore issues that need to be highlighted. If you want to read human interest stories, this is the account to follow.

7. @NJLahori

PHOTO: TWITTER

Nadia Jamil, darling of the people, is as popular on Twitter as she is otherwise. The activist-actor, and self-claimed foodie, brings to you the much-needed zest of Lahore.

8. @RafiaZakaria

PHOTO: TWITTER

Attorney, political philosopher and the author of The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan, Ms Zakaria is popular not without reason. She gives a less myopic and more global picture of issues that face present day Pakistan and the world.

https://twitter.com/rafiazakaria/status/595249549343629312

 

Boko Haram: “If it can happen in Nigeria, it can happen here in Pakistan”

By Zofeen T. Ebrahim / 13 May, 2014
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/05/boko-haram-anything-islam/

More than three weeks after the abduction of over 200 schoolgirls from the northern Nigerian town of Chibok by Boko Haram (BH), an Islamist militant group, the world is finally awake to the tragedy.

While Michelle Obama tweeted a photo of herself displaying the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls, Angelina Jolie said she was “sickened” by the “unthinkable cruelty” and has expressed her anger.

“I heard about it just a few days back when a friend posted an article on Facebook. I was stunned beyond words,” said 19-year old college student Iqra Moazzam, in Karachi, who cannot get over the fact that the girls may have already been sold.

Last week, BH’s leader Abubakar Shekau, threatened to “sell [the girls] in the market” into slavery.

“Not only was the Muslim community slow to respond but the West was also slow to respond,” pointed out Aurangzeb Haneef, who teaches Islamic Studies at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences. He said there was also some discussion on whether the response would have been quicker had the girls been white.

Boko Haram came about in 2009 in an attempt to impose Islamic law in all 36 Nigerian states. It has been behind killing of thousands of people in Nigeria in recent years and known to have links with other radical Islamist groups in North Africa and Sahel.

“I think they have defiled the name of Islam and added one more stain on the Muslim Ummah. I’m infuriated they are calling themselves Muslims; there is not a shred of Islam in their evil deed,” Moazzam said.

And yet surprisingly, there has been no word of condemnation from any religious institution, no indignation from the pulpit by imams during the weekly Friday sermons and no remonstration from the people in the Islamic world.

In September 2012, video-sharing website YouTube put up a 14-minute clip of Innocence of Muslims, produced by an American that was disrespectful of Islam, Muslims and the Prophet Muhammad, which sent a wave of protests throughout the Muslim world. In Pakistan, complete mayhem broke out: 30 people were killed and over 300 were injured.

The 12 cartoons published on 30 September 2005 by the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten of Prophet Muhammad, and which the Muslims found extremely and deliberately offensive, led to attempts on the life of the cartoonist and arson attempt made on the newspaper office.

Khalid Zaheer, an eminent religious scholar and vice-president of Al-Mawrid, a foundation for Islamic research and education, explained: “People come to the streets for issues about which they are sensitised by their scholars. Blasphemy is a topic that concerns the ulema (scholars) more because they have literature speaking against it.”

But he said: “Killing in the name of Islam is either considered an exaggerated propaganda, justified jihad, or atrocities done by some enemies who have conspired to malign Islam.” He said the narrow view of the world that is taught in madrassas and promoted in mosques causes non-issues to be made a matter of life and death and real issues to be ignored as if they don’t exist.

Haneef also attributed the inaction on the street to lack of response to the episode by the religious parties. He added: “Since the victims in this case are not Muslims (although some reports suggested that a few of them were Muslims) and since the accused here claim some kind of Islam, therefore, there has been understandable inertia on the part of Islamic parties to criticise BH.”

Unfortunately, pointed out Haneef: “Common Muslims are reluctant to take up issues involving atrocities against non-Muslims. Few people understand that these atrocities are in the name of Islam — Islam is being hurt here — yet they don’t feel compelled enough to raise their voice against BH.”

The same sentiment was endorsed by peace activist, Dr Pervez Hoodbhoy, who is also an academic. “I am sure that most Muslims do not approve of Muslims killing non-Muslims or other Muslims, but this does not raise passions in the same way.”

He also said: “Most Muslims today do disapprove of the mass abduction and sale of the Nigerian girls, but they prefer silence. There is vague discomfort that being too loud might cause Islamic fundamentals to come under scrutiny, something that is best avoided in these dangerous times.”

Hoodbhoy explained that with BH at war with those they consider infidels: “Women captured during tribal wars were part of the war booty and the Holy Quran is completely explicit on the distribution of every kind of booty, including women. Of course, as with slavery, most Muslims regard these verses as meant for those times only.” He said that was the takfiri (a Muslim who accuses another Muslim of apostasy) philosophy of the BH.

Khadeja Ebrahim 12, studying in Class 7, at a British school in Karachi likened the Nigerian militant group to the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP). “They seem like the Taliban we have in Pakistan, who attacked Malala and believe those seeking western-style education are committing a sin,” she told Index. Asked if she felt scared she nodded saying: “If it can happen in Nigeria, it can happen here in Pakistan and in Karachi too.”

Still, Hoodbhoy, finds the Taliban quite gentle when compared to the BH. “While the TTP does mount suicide attacks, and makes video tapes football matches played with the heads of decapitated Pakistan soldiers, the techniques employed by BH are brutal beyond description.”

This article was updated at 11:46 on 13 May, 2014.

This article was posted on May 13, 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

Taking Family Planning Religiously

Taking family planning religiously
While the voice from the pulpit carries a lot of weight, they will need to be convinced, informed and educated before their help is sought
By Farahnaz Zahidi Moazzam

“What do you think Islam says about Family Planning (FP)?”, I asked an urban, educated friend. Her response was as expected. “Isn’t FP a complete no-no in Islam?” she replied, a mother of two, whose two children have a carefully planned age difference of four years and who has been using an Intra-Uterine Device (IUD) for a long time as a method of contraception. A staunch Muslim, she believes FP is not allowed in Islam, yet is practicing it for years, and has not bothered to delve into the subject, avoiding tricky subjects.

As we approach the World Population Day on the 11th of July, the topic of understanding FP via religious rulings remains taboo. A fatalistic approach and a misfounded assumption that Islam is categorically against FP remains a key reason why Pakistan is sitting on a ticking time bomb of a population explosion. It also remains an under-discussed area in both print and electronic media.

“Today Pakistani population is five times as large as it was in 1950 and about 4 million people are added to it every year,” said Dr John Bongaarts of the Population Council, New York, at a recent seminar arranged by the Population Council in Pakistan. “By 2050, the population in the country is expected to reach 300 million.” If it hits that number, Pakistan would become the fourth largest country in the world. It has already replaced Brazil as the world’s fifth largest nation.

Generally, world over, a reduction in fertility rates and population growth has been seen, but Pakistan’s has increased. Pakistan’s total fertility rate (TFR: the number of live births the average woman has in her lifetime) is reported by the UN to be 3.2, the highest of any of the populous countries.

Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2007 (PDHS) reveals that only 24 percent of married women of rural Pakistan use contraception. Could religion have something to do with it?

This July, world leaders gather in London for a Family Planning Summit, co-hosted by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the U.K. Department for International Development, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.N. Fund for Population Action. Will the role of religious and cultural sensibilities be discussed there, one wonders.

In strongly faith-oriented societies such as Pakistan, unless something is endorsed by the clergy, meeting the development goals may be too far-fetched. As the bigwigs of family planning rack their brains over how to control Pakistan’s population, an important point might be being missed. The implications of an absence of national consensus-building with religious leaders on board may be a key reason. Indonesia, the world’s fourth most populous nation, also THE most populous Muslim country in the world, seems to have discovered this key and unlocked the answers. The result: Indonesia today is known as the “poster child” among countries aiming to slow down their growth rate. This is an incredible achievement, considering that Indonesia is a country with an almost 90 percent Muslim population, accounting for 13 percent of the world’s Muslim population. Studies show that Indonesia’s fertility rate at the 1965 level was averagely 5.6 children per woman. By incorporating a community-based family planning and reproductive health program, Indonesia has been able to slow down the TFR to an exemplary 2.6. How has Indonesia managed this?

The answer could lie in the fact BkkbN, Indonesia’s population and family planning board, employed the ingenious method of approaching the leaders of the two largest Muslim welfare groups in Indonesia: Muhammadiyah and the Nahdlatul Ulama, who have millions of followers. Both are traditionalist Islamic groups, yet with the government have achieved a consensus that they will work hand-in-hand for the welfare of the country. In line with true Islamic teachings, they work towards spiritual, emotional, physical and material well-being of their people. Taking health and education into their loop, it was but logical that reproductive health and FP are included in their program.

Dr. Atikah Zaki, the health and social coordinator of Asyiyah, the women’s branch of Muhammadiyah, adorns a hijaab. She is a practicing Muslim woman, unapologetic about her faith and evangelism. Simultaneously, she is also unapologetic about the fact that her organization promotes family well-being and family planning. Asyiyah promotes family planning through a network of 86 hospitals, hundreds of clinics, 87 universities and over 4,000 schools. Their local leaders counsel people about reproductive health issues, mediate disputes between couples and even address sensitive subjects like domestic violence. “We are just obeying the Prophet Mohammed,” said Zaki with a smile, explaining the concept of FP in Islam, quoting from the Quran and ahadith of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) at the recent Women’s Edition Seminar for female journalists, held at Jakarta.

Islam, and other religions for that matter, are not against contraception in totality. If the Quranic injunction on breastfeeding the child for two years is adhered to, it would automatically result in “lactational amenorrhea” which would result in spacing between children.

A major body of Islamic scholars, globally, agrees that in Islam, temporary and reversible methods of contraception are allowed. But contraception practiced with an aim to have a permanently childless marriage would not be permissible. Abortion is not permissible, and especially after a 120 days period has lapsed in the pregnancy, it is categorically forbidden because life is sacred. Temporary contraceptive methods that do not harm the health of the mother, and natural methods like Coitus Interruptus (withdrawal) and the Rhythm method that relies on knowledge of a woman’s ovulation cycle in order to avoid pregnancy, are preferred and allowed.

Relaying public health messages across to the population of Pakistan would become easier if they came through Imams of local mosques. But the religious leadership, human rights’ activists and health experts should work unanimously towards this goal. This requires dialogue and an understanding of each other’s view points.

Talking about the Pakistani society and involving clergy in realisation of the FP goals, journalist Zofeen Ebrahim says, “While the voice from the pulpit carries a lot of weight, they will need to be convinced, informed and educated before their help is sought, otherwise all the work towards it will come to naught. Not much time and we have to make up for the lost time. Therefore, everyone needs to be involved and taken on board.”

http://jang.com.pk/thenews/jul2012-weekly/nos-08-07-2012/pol1.htm#4