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Surah Yusuf – The Best of Stories – Reflections

Surah Yusuf, Chapter 12 of the Quran, is the most engaging, timeless, and complete story ever. It was relevant back then and it is relevant today.

Prophet Yusuf (as), known for his miraculously good looks, was beautiful both inside out. Often people advise pregnant women to recite it to have a beautiful baby. This tradition is not proven by any verse of the Quran or hadith. This is also is certainly not what the Surah is meant to be used for.

The real impact of this Surah is how it helps beautify relationships, and teaches invaluable lessons in times of difficulty and ease.

The Quran itself calls the true story of Prophet (Yusuf) “the best of stories”. It is the story of the life of Yusuf (as). Here are a few reflections on this Surah:

·         There are disadvantages of announcing your plans and showing off blessings – the evil eye (Nazr-e-Bad) and jealousy. Do not share plans till they materialize. For example initial pregnancy, intent to marry someone, the initial job interview that went well. Don’t also announce good dreams. (12:5)

·         Three elements of Sabrun Jameel (beautiful patience): Don’t announce your suffering all the time. Don’t complain to everyone. And don’t imply that you are perfect and free of faults. (12:18)

·         Maturity does not come without having gone through difficult times. Tough times have a way of making us stronger and hopefully wiser. (12:21)

·         The credit goes to Allah if we do something good and are able to ward off a temptation. The biggest temptation is narcissism and vanity. (12:24)

·         People don’t listen to our tableegh if we have not developed a relationship with them. See the example of Yusuf (as). He had developed a bond with the other inmates in jail. That is why they listened to him. Point: Work on relationships with sincerity.

·         Effects of your a’amaal (deeds) reflect on your face – both good and bad. In a world where you have to keep marketing yourself, humility becomes difficult. But it is important for tazkiyah (purification) of the nafs (self) to not announce your achievements all the time. However, undue humility can hamper you getting the deserved position. Therefore, maintain a balance. Tell when necessary & offer your services where needed. Undue modesty will stop you from doing the duty Allah assigned you. Be like Yousuf (as) – humble yet confident, but giving Allah credit for everything good. (Reflection of qualities of Yousuf {as})

·         To be a ‘mohsin’ – one with a beautiful attitude and nature – Sabr (patience) is inevitable. A reactive, inflammable personality cannot be a mohsin. (12:56)

·         In the era of Facebook and Instagram where we share every joy and share every plan with hundreds, we need to remind ourselves that Nazar-e-Bad [evil eye] is a reality. Safeguard yourself against it with prayers, especially the last 2 chapters of the Quran. Also do not announce your plans and every achievement and joy. (12:67)

·         “Do not grieve yourself over what they did” – Beautiful advice Yousuf (as) gave to his brother Bin Yameen. Reminder to self: Stop focusing on the few people who are a test for us and bother/hurt us. Instead, focus on those who are the coolness of your eyes, and are good to you. Ramadan is the best time to let go of this baggage of “I am hurt by him/her”. (12:69)

·         There is someone more knowledgeable than you, always. There is always someone who is better than you even in the things that you are good at. And the most Knowing and Perfect is Allah. So stay humble. You are not the ultimate. Never. (12:76)

·         Allah Knows the reality of people’s intentions and situations. Therefore stop judging people. You do not know their journey. You have not traveled their path. (12:77)

·         A sure shot test of whether you are a “mohsin” or not – check your behaviour with those who are under you or you have power over them. As a parent, as a senior at work, as a ruler, as someone who has house help. How are you with those who don’t have power over you? (12:78)

·         There is patience. And then there is what the Quran calls “Beautiful Patience” – Sabrun Jameel. Another sign of beautiful patience is that you stop assuming things about others and control your habit of judging others and commenting on them. (12:83)

·         Complain of your pain, heartache, and hurt others cause only to Allah. Allah can help. Those whom you gossip to cannot help. (12:86)

·         Give people the benefit of doubt. And at times even if you know they intended to harm you, do not announce in front of them that you know. Sometimes it is wiser to hold your peace. (12:89)

·         If someone hurt you a long time ago – it could even be a parent, a sibling, a friend – don’t think to yourself ‘I can never forget/forgive what he/she did’. Let go! Forgiving is healing for yourself more than anyone else. (12:92)

·         Sometimes grief leads to happiness, and failure leads to success, in the long run. Sometimes the very person that caused you great distress will become the cause of happiness. The situation will get better. Hang in there. (12:96)

·         Your company leads you to become the person you are. Therefore choose your company carefully. Good company in this world will lead us to be in the company of the righteous in the Hereafter. Choose wisely. (12:101)

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Day 20, 21, 22, 23 #Ramadan #Quran #ConflictResolution #CallTowardsAllah #Good #Evil

Day 20, 21, 22, 23 – CALL TOWARDS ALLAH, RESOLVE DIFFERENCES WITH GOODNESS & PATIENCE,

& SEEK REFUGE IN ALLAH

And who speaks better than he who calls to Allah while he himself does good, and says: I am surely of those who submit?

And the good deed and the bad deed are not equal. Repel [evil] by that [deed] which is good; and thereupon the one whom between you and him is enmity [will become] as though he was an intimate friend.

And none are made to receive it but those who are patient, and none are made to receive it but those who have a mighty good fortune.

And if an evil whisper from Shaitan (Satan) tries to turn you away (O Muhammad, upon him be peace) (from doing good), then seek refuge in Allah. Verily, He is the All-Hearer, the All-Knower.

Verses 33 to 36 –  Surah Fussilat:

Verse 41:33 – In a world full of words, talks and conversations, there is so much noise and too much info. Analyze the words we utter, speak, write, share. So many are undesirable – they may hurt others or be in-factual or exaggerated, or simply useless. But you can be sure that the most beautiful are the words that help others connect with Allah. Here, the act of dawah (calling towards Allah and towards Islam) is being called the best speech. But conditionally – the person doing so must couple it with righteous actions, and reaffirm his/her own faith. Needless to say that the act of dawah cannot be done effectively with hikmah (wisdom), rifq (gentleness), ‘ijz (humility) and naseeha (sincerity). yet, some from among believers must continue doing it, and the reward is multi-fold in an era where people are not ready to listen. Like today. That is precisely when it is most needed.

Narrated `Uthman:

The Prophet (ﷺ) said, “The best among you (Muslims) are those who learn the Qur’an and teach it.” (Bukhari)

Verse 41:34 – We lose it sometimes. We say things that cause friction and rifts, and cause fights and disagreements. We have falling outs of friends and break ups of spouses. Sometimes we feel it is just too late to say sorry or to make up. And sometimes, it is truly the fault of the other person. In either case, the casualty is the relationship. Here, the Quran says something beautiful: Good and bad behaviour are not the same and therefore yield different results. And if at all you make a mistake of hurting someone or souring a relationship, act toward that person with kindness, sincerity and affection. The golden rule here is that good repels evil, just like clean water washes away dirt. So even of your behaviour is faulty and full of mistakes, keep doing good deeds to makeup for your mistakes. Exceptions will always be there, but as a general rule, loving and kind behavior can makes friends out of foes and can rejoin broken ties.

Verse 41:35 – But to be nice to someone with whom you have had an unpleasant episode is not easy. Imagine having to say sorry after a fight. Imagine being kind and gentle to someone who was rude to you. This might be the path to rejoining relations, but its not easy. Yet, to crush one’s ego and take that first step, according to the Quran, is something also those with patience can do, and in the sight of Allah only the lucky ones get to do it.

Verse 41:36 – Remember when you contemplated being the first one to say Salam or say sorry or extend the hand of friendship after a fight? Shaitan will dfinitely whisper to you that it makes you look small, and remind you that you are not in fault, and plant in your mind the question “Why should I do it?” Because the reward of doing the right thing is so much, seek protection in Allah from such misleading whispers of Shaitan, and do the right thing anyways.

 

Day 11 to 17 #Ramadan #Quran #GoldenVerses #FormulaForSuccess

قَدْ أَفْلَحَ ٱلْمُؤْمِنُونَ
Certainly will the believers have succeeded
ٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ فِى صَلَاتِهِمْ خَٰشِعُونَ
They who are during their prayer humbly submissive
وَٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ عَنِ ٱللَّغْوِ مُعْرِضُونَ
And they who turn away from ill speech
وَٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ لِلزَّكَوٰةِ فَٰعِلُونَ
And they who are observant of zakah (obligatory charity)
وَٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ لِفُرُوجِهِمْ حَٰفِظُونَ
And they who guard their private parts
إِلَّا عَلَىٰٓ أَزْوَٰجِهِمْ أَوْ مَا مَلَكَتْ أَيْمَٰنُهُمْ فَإِنَّهُمْ غَيْرُ مَلُومِينَ
Except from their wives or those their right hands possess, for indeed, they will not be blamed
فَمَنِ ٱبْتَغَىٰ وَرَآءَ ذَٰلِكَ فَأُو۟لَٰٓئِكَ هُمُ ٱلْعَادُونَ
But whoever seeks beyond that, then those are the transgressors
وَٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ لِأَمَٰنَٰتِهِمْ وَعَهْدِهِمْ رَٰعُونَ
And they who are to their trusts and their promises attentive
وَٱلَّذِينَ هُمْ عَلَىٰ صَلَوَٰتِهِمْ يُحَافِظُونَ
And they who carefully maintain their prayers
أُو۟لَٰٓئِكَ هُمُ ٱلْوَٰرِثُونَ
Those are the inheritors
ٱلَّذِينَ يَرِثُونَ ٱلْفِرْدَوْسَ هُمْ فِيهَا خَٰلِدُونَ
Who will inherit al-Firdaus. They will abide therein eternally.
Beautiful, self-explanatory. Some of my personal favourite verses form the Quran. Ideal for those who want to do some hifz (memorization) and recite these verses in their namaz  after reflecting on their meaning.
These initial 11 verses from Surah al-Mu’minoon, Chapter 23, of the Quran, are one of those portions where a cluster, or a list as we may call it, of dos and don’ts, give us a short cap up of the basics. An example of similar clusters of these gems in the Quran are verses 63 to 76 of Chapter 25, Surah al-Furqan.
What is always unique in such certain key words in each verse.
The first 11 verses of this Surah have so many profound themes in them. The inter-relation of spiritual connection with Allah (swt) through ‘ibaadah (worship), and then social ethics, as well as inner purification and relationships with humans – what a complete eco-system of a good life!
The translations are pretty simple. I will just be going over some key terms.
Verse 1: The word “Aflah” from the root “fa-la-ha” denotes success that is complete, holistic and lasting. It is interesting to note that many words in Arabic that start with the sound “fa” give the meaning of something that is broken or split. “Fallah” in Arabic is a farmer – one who plants a seed, works on nurturing it, and the seed then splits, giving way to sapling and then a plant and then a crop, the benefits of which the farmer harvests. Likewise, a momin (believer), when working hard at pleasing good, avoids what Allah wants him/her to void, and does what Allah wants him/her to do, is traveling on a path that will ultimately lead to complete Falaah – success in both dunya and the Hereafter.
Verse 2: “Khaashi’oon” – The verse is not merely asking us to establish prayers, but goes a step further, and talks about what really makes an act of worship we perform 5 times a day worthy of Allah’s pleasure. To have Khushoo’ is to submit to God in complete humility, with acceptance of His Power, His Majesty and His Mercy. Thus, namaz (salaat) is not to be just a physical exercise but the heart must be involved.
Verse 3: “Laghw” – Speech that is useless, non-productive, evil (against one’s self or against another person), dirty – in short, all kinds of words and speech which Allah would disapprove of. Simply put, it displeases Allah (swt) when we misuse the beautiful gift of speech we have been given – cursing, profanity and expletives, backbiting, rumour mongering, verbal abuse, lying, and callous loose talk just for what everyone today calls shughal or fun. Not ok. Have to avoid consciously.
Verse 4: “Zakat” – Simply means purification. Notice how the verse literally says that the successful one’s are doers of purification. Obligatory charity is called Zakat because it purifies not just our wealth (from spending on wrong things, from over spending or from being stingy), but also purifies our heart from greed and selfishness. Tazkiyah – a word from the same root – is used for purification of the inner self from diseases of the soul like hate, jealousy, malice etc. This is a constant process Islam wants us to do till we are alive.
Verse 5:”Haafizoon” – Those who guard; here, guarding their chastity. A recurrent theme in the Quran is to not give in to physical lust or temptation. The pleasure one derives from that is temporary, but the guilt and consequences (in both this world and the next) are lasting.
Verse 6: “Ghaira Maloomeen” – Not blameworthy. The same act, in a relationship (marriage) prescribed by Allah, becomes an act of worship, for when a person fulfills one’s inherent physical desires in a relationship permitted by Allah, it becomes an act of obedience. Fidelity in marriage is important for a Muslim. Married or not, certain sins need to be kept at bay – “love” does not make it ok.
Verse 7: “‘Aadoon” – Those who transgress. Those who seek sexual fulfillment beyond the permissible, and insist on their sins, even though they have understood that this is forbidden, and feel no remorse, and have no intention of doing taubah (repenting).
Verse 8:”Raa’oon” – Beautiful word. Those who attentively guard. Two things to guard mentioned here: Amaanaat (trusts) – whatever Allah has entrusted you with (all the blessings and everything in your control which you could use or misuse to please or displease Him) and ‘Ahad – commitments, promises, pledges, whether you made these commitments to Allah or His creations. Islam does not take breaking of commitments lightly.
Verse 9:”Yuhafizoon” – Those who guard – here, referring to guarding their prayers. The daily obligatory prayers in particular are our constant connection with Allah. We may become wonderful human beings in other ways, but that does not make up for the required connection with Allah. Inner cleansing and spiritual connection with the Creator is not possible without regularity in namaz (salaat).
Verse 10: “Waarithoon”, some may pronounce it “Waarisoon” – the inheritors. Implying that they are deserving of what they will inherit in the Herefter – Paradise.
Verse 11: “Khaalidoon” – eternal. Jannah is worth struggling for because in this world, no pleasure is forever. Everything in this temporary world withers, changes and eventually ends, whether it is physical beauty or the joy of love or a moment of enjoyment. Imagine a world where joy, love, satisfaction, peace and happiness does not wither, change or end. That is what we should strive for.

Day 2 #Ramadan #Quran #Verseoftheday #TooMuchHalaal

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Day 2 – TOO MUCH OF A HALAAL THING

7_31

O children of Adam! Beautify yourselves for every act of worship, and eat and drink [freely], but do not be extravagant (waste): verily, He does not love the extravagant!

Oh man! This one’s a toughie. Reason being that with the forbidden stuff, we know its a no-no. But this is all allowed, in fact recommended stuff….Allah has allowed us to eat well and dress well and enjoy the blessings He has given to us, but be thankful and share with those who have less than us. So far so good. But that’s not all. The use of all things good is conditional – do not overspend or waste or use it for means of being pompous and showing off.

Ramadan, ironically enough, is the toughest time to act on this verse. On one hand during Ramadan charity flows like water, for Muslims do believe in charity as one of the paths to Paradise. Yet, because the affluent Muslims give so much for Allah’s pleasure, they assume that if they are giving enough charity, that is a licence to be spendthrift and waste and flaunt. “Itna to deti hoon Allah ke raastay mein. Phir agar iftar par dus dishes rakh leen to kya farq parta hai (I give so much in the path of Allah. So what if I serve prepare 10 food items for iftar)” is the common retort. Fact is, giving charity does not justify overspending and wasting. One of the very things Ramadan aims at developing in us is accountability for Allah’s blessings. Extravagance saps that sentiment. Those who can afford it buy two dresses per day for the three days of Eid, run to “all you can eat” deals, and host iftars that are elaborate spreads fit for kings. So much time, effort, and money goes into all this. And to what end?

In our over zealousness for Ramadan, we over-buy, overspend, overeat, overdress, overcook, over-hoard groceries pre Ramadan. We overdo everything. The word for this is “Israaf” and one who does this is a “Musrif” and that is precisely the person Allah does not want us to become. Irony of ironies – we really work hard in Ramadan to ward off haraam (and even halaal during the fasting hours) to please Allah, but end up displeasing Him (God forbids) by extravagance.

Very related to Israaf is “Tabzeer” – wastage. There’s only so much you can wear or eat or hoard. When we overdo it all, we end up wasting it all. Food in the bin after a dinner is testimony of this – the over-piled dinner plates are the issue.

I found it fascinating that as I searched for verse 7:31 on the internet, I came across 1 Corinthians 7:31, and here is what the biblical verse says: “Those who use the things of the world, as if not engrossed in them. For this world in its present form is passing away.”

Extravagance is a symptom of a deeper disease: We are too attached to this world, and too involved in its hedonistic pleasures.

Islam is beautiful. We are advised not to renounce any pleasures, but just keep it under check and balance. So let’s try and do that, lest overdoing halaal makes it the opposite.

Pearls from the amazing Surah Taha – Lesson in Gentleness

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It is here…the most blessed of months. Ramadan ❤

What I am hoping to do here is InshaAllah post verses from the Holy Quran in the coming month….as nothing more but a reminder for myself. For when we share knowledge with others, we inevitably are the first addressees of it. These verses are not in any particular order. But each one has touched my heart and taught me what I needed to learn. May we all be able to act upon each verse of the glorious Quran. Ameen.

SPEAK GENTLY

20:44

“And speak to him mildly, perhaps he may accept admonition or fear Allah.” (20:44)

So imagine this. There is this person who is arrogant, rude, dismissive, and thinks it his right to not just demean you but also threatens to kill you. And knowing him, he will. Yet, you are asked to go to him and share with him with utmost sincerity what will make his life better, both here and in the Hereafter. But your being sincere does not mean you cannot anticipate that this person is going to humiliate and insult you publicly…you are well aware and are expecting a terrible response. Yet, you are told to swallow your pride and go to him, hope and believe that your sincerity MAY bring out the inherent human goodness in his heart, and here comes the tough part…..speak to him gently and mildly….modulate the tone of your voice in a way that it is polite and congenial and choose words carefully. May be…just may be….he may understand.

This is what the two Prophets Moosa (as) and Haroon (as) are being told to do as they are being sent to the court of Pharaoh. What a massive, massive test of faith!

For those who have studied the 20th chapter of the Quran, Surah Taha, from which this verse is taken, would know what a touching chapter it is, as it talks about the entire odyssey of Moosa (as)…. from being separated as an infant from his mother, to being brought up as the adopted prince of Egypt, to having to live in the desert as a nomad, and then being called upon as a Prophet to lead his people out of bondage….and confront the very person he would have most liked to avoid confronting….and on top of it do that “gently”.

What a life! And through it all, Moosa (as) as Allah’s apostle is very human and real…showing human emotions like anger and fear….yet always obedient to his Creator.

For those of us who have had a life less ordinary, this Surah is like a mirror. It tells you about how Moosa (as), a role model for us, handled “change” in life.

It is much too easy to be harsh….much too easy to be snappy and rude and intimidate people with sarcasm or taunts or a loud harsh way of speaking. They may be quietened. But then they do not really listen to you. It takes courage and a big heart to speak gently.

This verse reminds us that it is not only important that we keep a track of what we say but how we say it. In person, or on social media. In agreement or in disagreement. The choice of words, the tone, and also the sincerity matters….for even if sometimes the tone is soft and the words are mild, the words under-laced with sarcasm do not touch hearts.

May Allah help us speak gently….from our heart.

Some beautiful lessons from Surah Taha:

·         Open my heart. What a dua! Open-heartedness helps us develop empathy, and shun selfishness. (20:25)

·         Pray for better communication skills. It enables you to understand and be understood. (20:27/28)

·         On the path of Allah’s pleasure, don’t take a solo flight. Get some steam from your family. Develop a support group from within your closest circle. You need the support so pray for it. (20:29)

·         If you are popular and loved, it is also a blessing from Allah. It is a special gift. Use it well. (20:39)

·         It helps to remember some mistakes you made in the past. If you have repented and turned around, don’t pretend your past never happened. Acknowledge it, and thank Allah for the chance of having turned around. This keeps us humble. (20:40)

·         Allah makes us go through ups and downs and various stops and stations in the journey of life because Allah is grooming us and carving us for something we are meant to do at a later stage. Trust His decisions. (20:41)

·         Always believe in the inherent human goodness. You never know when someone may have a change of heart and turn over a good leaf. (20:44)

·         The process of learning never ends. Keep learning; keep growing. For a deeper understanding of the Quran, step one is attending daura or classes. But you also have to do self-study…..ghaur o fikr….reflect….individually. How will you do it? Take one ayat. Read repeatedly. Reflect on the many interpretations. Then read many tafaaseer of it. Then ask your teachers about that verse.  Don’t just say “Rabbi zidni ilma”. Take each verse of the Quran and when you are reading it ask Allah “Ya Allah, explain its meaning to me”. (20:99/100)

·         Turning away from the message of the Quran has lasting detrimental effects on our lives. One of them, mentioned here, is a restriction of the heart – having everything yet not being content, unexplained sadness, easy things becoming difficult, deep-seated depression. (20:124)

·         Looking longingly at blessings of other people robs us of contentment. Appreciate what you have instead of constant comparisons. (20:131)

Making Arabic compulsory in Pakistan’s schools? Why?

By Farahnaz Zahidi

arabic
This will be a rewarding move if the ministry also considers what is being taught to students in the name of Islam and more importantly how it is being taught. PHOTO: REUTERS

Arabic came into my life out of a desire to know and understand what was written in the Holy Quran. My curious, questioning mind needed answers and I now know that a one-on-one relationship with the Quran has the potential to alter my life forever.

Having lived that, I thank God repeatedly for being blessed with the understanding of Arabic. It is wonderful when you no longer have to rely on translations to understand your faith. Translations are a great starting point, but the Quran’s feel tends to get lost in translations.

You understand what it is saying when you read, say, translations by Marmaduke Pickthall, Abdullah Yusuf Ali or Fateh Muhammad Jallandhari, but you lose out on the nuances and the delicate meanings.

You do not get to know that the word ‘Bushra’ means happiness that starts reflecting on one’s skin and that all Arabic words from the root letters ‘Jeem Noon Noon’ allude towards things that are not visible – things like Jannat (heaven), Jinn (creatures of the unseen world) and Junoon (trance or mania).

Understanding Arabic gave the five prayers more soul and the Ramazan taraweeh became a joy for me.

Another step forward was reading other Islamic literature sources in depth, like Sahih Bukhari and books about the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh). One relishes the sweetness of why the Prophet (pbuh) nick-named Hazrat Ali (ra) ‘Abu Turaab’ and the poems that Hassan ibn Thaabit (ra) wrote in defence of the Prophet (pbuh).

Even apart from Islamic literature, the richness of the Arabic language is undisputed. Knowing the language opens the door to the poetry of Ibn al Farid and the spiritual treatise of Ibn Qayyim al Jawzi.

I love visiting mosques and museums where Arabic inscriptions make sense to me now. The prefix ‘al’ no longer irks me.

I love the language.

I am unapologetic that as a Muslim, Arabic is not just another language for me. And yes, as a mother, I would love my daughter to also experience the same joy. The preface above is meant to clarify to the readers that I am neither anti-Arabic nor a person who does not value the possible advantages of learning the language.

The problem with compulsory Arabic

Having said that, I have misgivings about the recent statement by the Minister of Religious Affairs, Sardar Muhammad Yousuf, about making Arabic compulsory in primary schools.

More than what is being suggested in this proposal, it is the way that this is being done and the reasons being given, which have left many of us ambiguous about whether this will be a good move or not.

The minister’s statement that this will be a counter-terrorism and anti-sectarianism strategy seems more like an alibi.

Are we, arguably, saying that learning Arabic will fight certain tendencies?

Are all Arabic-speaking nations free of these challenges?

Sadly, many a times such turmoil and strife is evident in Arab-speaking nations.

Also, I have to wonder if knowing Arabic is actually the route to being better Muslims and better humans.

While there is no doubt that knowing the language of the Quran and hadith would bring us closer to a better understanding of Islam, it can be so only for those who choose to understand Islam via Arabic, and then try and act on the ethics that Islam has given us.

Teaching a language by force cannot be seen as a formula for producing a generation of better Muslims.

And fortunately, Pakistan does not have a dearth of Arabic teachers.

What will actually make this a rewarding move is if the ministry also considers what is being taught to students in the name of Islam and more importantly how it is being taught. If they do use it correctly, it will indeed be a good move to introduce better ethics through religion.

There have been dissenting voices on the issue.

Some have jumped the gun and reacted a bit too strongly to the idea of making Arabic compulsory because for them Arabic is somehow the language of Saudi Arabia – of hardliners and extremists. They may have overlooked the fact that for a lot of people in this country, the move would be a welcome one – especially for parents who have a hard enough time meeting the demands of their children’s increasingly competitive study regimes and barely manage to make children learn the recitation of the Holy Quran, let alone its meaning.

In this light, for these parents who wish their children to learn Arabic, the ministry’s suggestion is a blessing. However, here is the inevitable ‘but’.

Undoubtedly, languages make us grow and soar. They have the power to unify and to liberate. But one cannot discount the fact that languages have been used, throughout human history, to strengthen imperialistic ambitions and designs. Each colonial power left its territorial mark in the form of stipulations about languages, and the languages were then used as tools of proselytising people into thinking in certain boxes.

One hopes this is not a means to making people think Islam is a monolithic entity and teaching Arabic will not end up conditioning students to look at Islam in a reductionist pattern of “I am right and everyone else is wrong”.

It would be important to know opinions of people whose children will be taught Arabic in schools and how they feel about this move. I would also need to know how and what exactly will be taught in Arabic; what will the curriculum look like and who are the teachers who are able enough to handle this important tool, because we, unfortunately, have not set for ourselves a good precedence when it comes to teachers for Islamiat.

So here is the thing.

This is one of those issues on which I have mixed feelings. My tilt is in favour of making more people, and more importantly more Muslims, learn the language of the Quran. But based on my experience as a Pakistani, I am forced to think about the possible hidden motives behind this proposal.

I do hope that there are no reasons for this but to make us grow into better humans and Muslims.

Let us wait and watch.

Wallahu A’alam

(And Allah Knows best).

http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/20545/making-arabic-compulsory-in-pakistans-schools-why/