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Tag Archives: National Commission on Status of Women

Reproductive health: ‘Healthy mothers mean a healthy nation’

Published: September 12, 2014

Research shows that when a mother dies, the children that are left behind are more likely to grow into adults with psychological issues. PHOTO: SHIRKATGAH

KARACHI: If you ask me what the government is doing about maternal and reproductive health of women and family planning, my answer will be ‘nothing’, said Planning Commission of Pakistan population section chief Shahzad Malik.

Malik – along with members of provincial assemblies, government officials, gender activists and members of civil society – said this at an event held at the Beach Luxury hotel on Wednesday. Organised by the Shirkatgah Women’s Resource Centre, ‘Next Steps: Achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights through a coherent post-2015 framework’ was a national consultation with stakeholders.

The discourse remains relevant as ever, with an estimated 30,000 women dying every year due to birth-related mishaps. While Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) in Pakistan may have improved – dropping from 490 in 1990 to 260 in 2010 – a lot still needs to be done. MMR is the number of women per 100,000 live births who die of pregnancy and childbirth related complications. A staggering number of abortions – somewhere between 800,000 and 900,000 – are carried out in Pakistan every year, and most of them classified as unsafe abortions. Lack of contraceptive facilities and absence of timely family planning are the major reasons, as most women getting abortions are married women getting rid of an unwanted pregnancy.

Representatives from each province shared their experiences and problems. Balochistan’s representation was sorely missing as the speakers could not make it to the event. However, some jarring issues came to the fore in the discussions, such as the fact pointed out by moderator Imran Shirvanee. “Only two political parties bothered to talk to health experts when designing the public health manifesto, before the 2013 general elections,” said Shirvanee, refusing to divulge the names of the parties.

Punjab MPA Dr Najma Afzal Khan shared information about positive reproductive health initiatives and headways made in the province of Punjab. “The Punjab chief minister is committed to improving maternal health,” she said.

“In Punjab, there has definitely been progress,” said Dr Zafar Ikram, provincial coordinator of the Maternal, Neo-natal and Child Health Programme, Punjab. “However, problems such as unmet need of family planning methods persist. Gestational diabetes is on the rise and there is hardly any emphasis on post-menopausal cancer.”

The problems in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP), as pointed out by MPA Arshad Umerzai, are mostly to do with the security situation. “Also, while the policies of the provincial government in KP may be commendable, a lack of coordination and strained relations between the federal and provincial governments hinders progress.”

Issues related to governance and social and demographic dynamics were also discussed, and recommendations were made to improve the situation. Some of the problems pertaining to funding owe to the confusion that still exists between provincial and the federal governments after the 18th Amendment.

As the participants pointed out, it is time for maternal health to be taken seriously, especially since research shows that when a mother dies, the children that are left behind are more likely to grow into adults with psychological issues. Such issues, experts shared, are likely to fall into extremist behaviour as well.

Published in The Express Tribune, September 12th, 2014.

Hits and misses: Developments indicate better days for women’s rights

By Farahnaz ZahidiPublished: February 23, 2014
http://tribune.com.pk/story/675083/hits-and-misses-developments-indicate-better-days-for-womens-rights/

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Discussing Sindh, experts shared that enrolment of girls in schools is going up and there is an increased focus on funding female literacy projects. PHOTO: FILE

KARACHI:
Somewhere in Pakistan, a woman is struggling to get a CNIC, but NADRA only accepts a biometric system of identification whereby her thumb must be scanned. Her thumbs are too chafed due to constant work in agricultural fields with sickles.
Another woman in Pakistan is sucked into an armed conflict situation. Her son is taken away at a tender age by people she knows will misuse him, but when it comes to the peace process, her opinion is not taken into account. At another location in Pakistan, a jirga of men sits and decides a woman’s fate, while other women who are members of the community cannot share their perspective
The questions and issues are multiple. The achievements, challenges and opportunities in this regard were discussed recently at the one-day Provincial Consultation of Sindh for the State Report on Beijing+20. Held on February 21, it was organised by the National Commission on Status of Women (NCSW), Shirkatgah and Rozan. It aimed at involving all stakeholders including NGOs, parliamentarians and activists.
NCSW is leading the process of compiling the State Report on Beijing Plan for Action, which is an agenda for women’s empowerment. In this, NCSW is being co-facilitated by Shirkatgah and Rozan.
Beneath a whole lot of jargon that development sector professionals typically use, the underlying idea was resounding: what will it take for humanity to realise that salvation, progress and development are all clutched tight in the fist of one single solution – empowering the mother, the daughter, the wife, the sister. It is a little difficult for a journalist to understand what it exactly means by “best practice” and how can a 100 plus people know all the UN resolutions and Pakistan’s legislations regarding women by heart. Yet, the sincerity is obvious in such meets. And a lot of good is coming out of them.
Just talking of Sindh, experts shared that girl-child enrolment in schools is going up. There is an increased focus on funding for female literacy projects, including women with minor disabilities. The Domestic Violence Act and laws pertaining to acid burning, as well as the anti-women practices acts are promising. There is increasing talk of involving women in peace processes as equal stakeholders, even if they are unaware that UN Resolution 1325 requires us to do it. Land allotment schemes are tilting towards including female peasants as small land-holders.
Yet, as discussed in presentations given by the many groups that had been given different topics pertaining to women’s empowerment, there are many ifs and buts. For example, when talking of the encouraging presence of women in the field of media, it was pointed out that the growth of women in this field should not be only horizontal but also vertical, whereby more women in media should be in decision-making key positions. It was discussed that the UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women stated 20 years ago that “violence against women is an obstacle to the achievement of equality, development and peace”. Much remains to be achieved but it appears that Pakistan is at least on the journey towards a better future for its women.
Published in The Express Tribune, February 23rd, 2014.